Feed The Scousers Premier League Football Chant Meaning, Lyrics And History

Feed The Scousers Premier League Football Chant Meaning, Lyrics And History

It looks like Leicester fans haven’t mended their unpleasant behaviour after all these years as the chant of feed the Scousers only grew louder, know its meaning and history

It was Diogo Jota who scored the winning penalty in front of several sour Leicester City fans who saw their team getting beaten on penalties in the quarter-final of the Carabao Cup. But if you are wondering that it was after their loss that they started their “feed the Scousers” chants, then you are highly mistaken.

Even before kick-off, Leicester fans did not limit themselves from insulting the home side fans by singing a rendition of “feed the Scousers”. However, this did not enrage the Liverpool fans as much as the Leicester fans would have wanted. Instead, the Merseyside fans got back with the classic “F*** the Tories’’ response in order to let the East Midlands supporters know why they were singing that song.

But what is the story behind the origin of the “feed the scousers it’s Christmas time” chants? Let’s find out.

“Feed The Scousers” Premier League Chant Meaning, Significance, Lyrics Origin/History

The ‘Feed the scousers’ chants are not new at all. In fact they have been around since 1984 when Band Aid made a record by raising up to 8 million pounds for the starving population in Africa. It has now been 37 years and those chants are from over, commemorating unemployment shamelessly. We witnessed this type of behaviour from Wolves fans as well when they chanted “Sign On!”, “You’ll never get a job!’’ and “With a pen in your hand” to Liverpool fans.

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Do you know when these “sign on’’ chants were heard for the first time? They were first aired during the early years of Thatcher when unemployment saw a sharp rise on unemployment -as high as 20 per cent, higher in inner city areas. It was a way of expressing frustration on losing against Liverpool and Everton as these two were dominating English football at the time.

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Fans of other clubs knew realized that the clubs they supported could not win against either, especially Merseyside on the football pitch, so they came up with a way of getting back at them with these meaningless and childish chants. Stooping to such a level where they mocked the poverty-stricken city and harrowing conditions of unemployment that prevailed within Merseyside was a way of getting revenge for rival fans.

After 37 years to be precise, things haven’t changed. But the joke’s on Leicester City fans as they lost the quarter final of the Carabao Cup against Jurgen Klopp’s mighty men in what turned out to be a thrilling round of penalties.

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