Did Fidel Castro invent the Euro step in basketball as video goes viral on Twitter/X

Did Fidel Castro invent the Euro step in basketball as video goes viral on Twitter/X

Check out what’s true as the popular tik tok theory about Fidel Castro inventing the Euro step takes over social media

For the past two weeks, pictures of the Castro family playing basketball have appeared alongside this unlikely tale on TikTok and X.

Did Fidel Castro invent the Euro step in basketball as video goes viral on Twitter/X and TikTok

A basketball player who picks up his dribble, takes a stride in one way, and then swiftly takes a second step in a different direction is said to be performing a Euro Step. To trick a defender, a player takes two enormous steps in opposite directions.

A basketball player can gather his dribble and take two steps at a time. To avoid a defender, the second step in the Eurostep moves in the opposite direction as the first. However, there is a theory going viral on social media about who invented the Euro Step.

Advertisement

Pictures of Castro participating in the game offer plenty of proof, and those images served as the inspiration for the widespread misconception on social media about his love of the Euro step.

“How Fidel Castro Invented the Euro Step: A Brief Oral History” is the title of a satirical blog article that gave rise to the viral hypothesis. A fictitious backstory of Castro’s admiration for the well-known basketball motion was presented by sports journalist Micah Wimmer.

In his article, Wimmer used a fictitious item from Che Guevara’s journal in which he sneers Castro for the two-step. Guevara’s apparent disenchantment with his fellow Cuban revolutionary, combined with Castro’s alleged creation of the manoeuvre, caused a stir on the internet.

Advertisement

Castro did not create the Euro Step, as Wimmer claimed in a recent social media post, but he was amused that the general public had been tricked by his idea. Wimmer came up with the concept in his head and his imagination.

Advertisement

Although it was merely a side note to his extensive political career, Castro loved basketball. According to the New York Times, he informed biographer Tad Szulc that the basketball player’s anticipation, agility, and dexterity were the closest of any sport to the revolutionary’s abilities.

PLAY: FREE ONLINE GAMES

error: This function is not allowed